Friday, March 24, 2017
Last updated: 1 year ago

UBC is handing out scholarships for $0

$0 Award

Yesterday an (un)lucky student by the name of Dylan received an email from the UBC Awards Office congratulating him on earning the Chancellor’s Scholar Award, a scholarship designed to “recognize the outstanding academic achievements of high-school and post-secondary students.”

Dylan received $0.00 for his academic excellence.

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He vented his frustrations in a Reddit post entitled “Thanks UBC!” noting that the situation felt like a “bad practical joke.” We’re inclined to agree.

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Brutal.

Brutal.

Others in the thread confirmed that this had happened to them too, and added their frustration at the “non-award.”

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  • J T

    Just to re-emphasize for the hasty readers who jump on the hate bandwagon: the Chancellor’s Scholar “award” was never intended to be a monetary award– it’s essentially just a fancy title given to those with a GPA of 95%+ from high school.

    That said, it’s SUPER ANNOYING that they send it out in the same manner as a monetary scholarship (because of the above-mentioned triggering of false hopes– I suffered it too), and even more irritating that this move replaced actual automatic entry scholarships for high school students (see: http://ubyssey.ca/news/chancellor-scholar-award-666/).

    Given that a lot of high school grades are severely over-inflated and might not reflect the student’s aptitude for success in a university environment though, replacing the automatic entry scholarship for high school students with this DESIGNATION (I wouldn’t call it an award) is probably a good idea (in my opinion) only if those scholarships are then funneled towards students already in the university and actually succeeding (assuming that money is still kept in the budget for scholarships and not transferred to other, more constructive expenditures).

    As for the designation itself, I still think it means absolutely nothing in the long run– having it in particular hasn’t won me any jobs as far as I know.